Home Away From Home

In the following section we invite you in. Turn the doorknob and step inside. This is home. It is the main base from where we practice our daily lives. But home is not just a place it is also something we sense, feel and make. We can make ourselves at home in both physical and mental environments, and this is what we delve into in this section about homes away from home. Through the following texts you will find that places have many different meanings and are not just either or.

Visiting two Danish continuation schools we look into teenagers’ lives away from home; they live at the school. It becomes their home for a year. Getting an inside view on the daily life at the school, we are invited to consider what the role this kind of secondary home has in the Danish society? Why do the teenagers choose this type of educational institution? Can the school provide the teenagers with something that is not accessible in a normal school? The two visits also put into question what “growing up” entails in a Danish context, and what it says about conceptions of childhood and adulthood.

Next we visit two Danish care homes: a private care home and a municipally care home. Here we come across the last home of many elders, but as we shall see, the borderline between whether this is a home or an institution is a question not easily answered. Can the care home be a private home while being a public institution in the Danish healthcare system? What makes a home a home? As we meet with the elderly people at the care homes we investigate what material things and daily activities has to do with the concept of home.

Lastly we are invited to join for six dinners in six different Danish homes. Two Danish homes represent one generation of three different generations of the Danish population. While cooking and sharing a Danish meal we look into what Danish food is. Do the three generations look differently on what Danish food is like and what it means to them? Is there some food that is more typical Danish than others? How do Danes practice their food habits and do specific traditions attach to the practice of eating?

Welcome home – away from home.

Main themes: Food culture, family, communities, sharing, rituals, tradition and age
Main themes: Food culture, family, communities, sharing, rituals, tradition and age
Main themes: Welfare, home and institution, material culture, community, age
Main themes: Education, secondary family, friends, adolescence, maturing, home and institution
Main themes: Education, secondary family, friends, adolescence, maturing, home and institution
Main themes: Secondary home, upbringing, children, parents, pedagogues, playing, education